photography byDanny Liao

Considering that there are roughly 4 million people living in the city of Los Angeles, you might be wondering how we went about selecting a cross-section of just 47 of them — a mere .001 percent of the total population — for our annual People Issue.

Well, it was hardly a scientific process — nothing as involved as, say, cataloging millions of vintage photos spanning our city’s vast history (as People Issue person Amy Inouye has helped do). It wasn’t as strenuous as conducting deep sociological research to determine once and for all why we swipe right (yep, Tinder psychologist Jess Carbino went there). Nor was it as precise as diving for the most pristine of sea urchins (we’ll leave that to Stephanie Mutz). It didn’t demand nearly as much time as public art duo Greenmeme’s latest project (Freyja Bardell and Brian Howe spent eight years on their soon-to-be-unveiled L.A. River sculpture installation). And we gotta admit that it wasn’t nearly so demanding as simultaneously catering dinners for Black Sabbath, Justin Bieber and Obama (hat tip to Shelleylynn Brandler for that).

Perhaps the easiest way to sum up our methodology is to say that we simply collected those people whose own methodology — and creativity and perseverance and passion — inspire us.

The beauty of the People Issue — now in its 10th year — is that these people continue to inspire us long after the ink on the pages has dried (or after we hold our breath and hit “publish” online). One of the best parts about the issue is that, once the heavy lifting is done, we get to sit back and watch as these astounding Angelenos go on to do ever more amazing things. Fortunately, we won’t have to wait long for Maria Bamford’s Netflix show Lady Dynamite, which premieres in two weeks, or for the fourth season of Marc Maron’s Maron. And we’re betting we’ll have a lot to look forward to in the years to come from Real 92.3’s Nhandi Craig, aka DJ Young 1. And we’re not just saying that because she’s 13.

If there’s a common thread among these people, the .001 percent, we’re not totally sure what it is — though we suspect the answer lies in the questions raised by R&B sex god Miguel in the course of his People Issue interview: “What do you care about?” he asked. “What don’t you give a fuck about? How are you gonna give a shit in a way that’s uniquely you?”

Here are 47 Angelenos being uniquely themselves. —Mara Shalhoup

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Adam Weiss & David Romo: The Party Starters
Alex Estrada: From Mariachi to Hardcore
Amy Inouye: A Friend to Millions of Vintage Photos
April O'Neil: Pinball Wiz, Emo Ambassador and Porn Star
Azad Right: A New Breed of Label Boss
Brilliant Garcia: Elevating the Art Scene at 22
Cecil Castellucci: Writing the Book on Princess Leia
Dave Gibbs: The Unlikely Wine Collector
Chuy Tovar: The Mexican Food Evangelist
David Irvin: The King of Restaurant Logos
Daddy Kev: Lord of the Low End
Daniel Lopez: The Democratic Wunderkind
Derek Michael: The Happy Camper
Brian Howe & Freyja Bardell: Sculpting the L.A. River
Eddie "Ghetto Baby" Daniels: The Rock & Roll Survivor
James Butts: The Man Who Turned Inglewood Around
Frances Michelle Lopez: The Craft Beer Booster
Jennicet Gutiérrez: The Trans Activist Who Interrupted Obama
Jennifer Leitham: Overcoming Jazz’s Transphobia
Justina Blakeney: The Boho Blogger
Jesse Rogg: A New Kind of Mogul
Verbs: The Where’s Waldo? of L.A. Hip-Hop
Jess Carbino: The Tinder Sociologist
Maggie Ehrig: The Birth Artist
Marc Maron: The Podcaster
Melissa Rosenberg: The Wonder Woman of Showrunners
Maria Bamford: The Late Bloomer
Miguel: The Soul Seducer
Mauricio Umansky: The Celebrity Real Estate Agent
Mitzi Yates Lizárraga: The Principal
Nhandi Craig: The Tween Radio Star
R.J. DeVera: The Import Expert
Nick Metropolis: The King of Collectibles
Robbie Keane: The Undercover Soccer Star
Renee Gunter: The Organic Produce Goddess of West Adams
Robert Egger: The Food Activist
Shelleylynn Brandler: Caterer to the Rock Stars
Sona Movsesian: Late-Night TV’s Armenian Ambassador
Solo Scott: From Surf to Turf
Stephanie Mutz: The Uni Diver
Solomon Georgio: The Comedian Who Wouldn’t Quit
Terrace Martin: Kendrick Lamar’s Secret Weapon
Tin Vuong: The Restaurant Empire Builder
Tito Bonito: Putting the “Boy” in “Boylesque”
Valentina Garza: Primetime’s Latina Voice
Zackey Force Funk: The Funky Rocketeer
Alexandra Nagy: The Environmentalist who’s Preventing an L.A. Disaster

Alexandra Nagy: The Environmentalist who’s Preventing an L.A. Disaster

photography by Danny Liao

Considering that there are roughly 4 million people living in the city of Los Angeles, you might be wondering how we went about selecting a cross-section of just 47 of them — a mere .001 percent of the total population — for our annual People Issue.

Well, it was hardly a scientific process — nothing as involved as, say, cataloging millions of vintage photos spanning our city’s vast history (as People Issue person Amy Inouye has helped do). It wasn’t as strenuous as conducting deep sociological research to determine once and for all why we swipe right (yep, Tinder psychologist Jess Carbino went there). Nor was it as precise as diving for the most pristine of sea urchins (we’ll leave that to Stephanie Mutz). It didn’t demand nearly as much time as public art duo Greenmeme’s latest project (Freyja Bardell and Brian Howe spent eight years on their soon-to-be-unveiled L.A. River sculpture installation). And we gotta admit that it wasn’t nearly so demanding as simultaneously catering dinners for Black Sabbath, Justin Bieber and Obama (hat tip to Shelleylynn Brandler for that).

Perhaps the easiest way to sum up our methodology is to say that we simply collected those people whose own methodology — and creativity and perseverance and passion — inspire us.

The beauty of the People Issue — now in its 10th year — is that these people continue to inspire us long after the ink on the pages has dried (or after we hold our breath and hit “publish” online). One of the best parts about the issue is that, once the heavy lifting is done, we get to sit back and watch as these astounding Angelenos go on to do ever more amazing things. Fortunately, we won’t have to wait long for Maria Bamford’s Netflix show Lady Dynamite, which premieres in two weeks, or for the fourth season of Marc Maron’s Maron. And we’re betting we’ll have a lot to look forward to in the years to come from Real 92.3’s Nhandi Craig, aka DJ Young 1. And we’re not just saying that because she’s 13.

If there’s a common thread among these people, the .001 percent, we’re not totally sure what it is — though we suspect the answer lies in the questions raised by R&B sex god Miguel in the course of his People Issue interview: “What do you care about?” he asked. “What don’t you give a fuck about? How are you gonna give a shit in a way that’s uniquely you?”

Here are 47 Angelenos being uniquely themselves. —Mara Shalhoup

AdamWeiss & David Romo
Alex Estrada
Amy Inouye
April O'Neil
Azad Right
Brilliant Garcia
Cecil Castellucci
Chuy Tovar
Daddy Kev
Dave Gibbs
David Irvin
Daniel Lopez
Derek Michael
Eddie "Ghetto Baby" Daniels
Frances Michelle Lopez
Brian Howe & Freyja Bardell
James Butts
Jennicet Gutiérrez
Jennifer Leitham
Jesse Rogg
Jess Carbino
Justina Blakeney
Verbs
Maggie Ehrig
Marc Maron
Maria Bamford
Mauricio Umansky
Melissa Rosenberg
Miguel
Mitzi Yates Lizárraga
Nhandi Craig
Nick Metropolis
Renee Gunter
R.J. DeVera
Robbie Keane
Robert Egger
Shelleylynn Brandler
Solo Scott
Solomon Georgio
Sona Movsesian
Stephanie Mutz
Terrace Martin
Tin Vuong
Tito Bonito
Valentina Garza
Zackey Force Funk
Alexandra Nagy